US sues to block Electrolux buy of GE appliance business

L-R: An Electrolux stove is offered for sale alongside a Frigidaire and GE stove at an appliance store on September 8, 2014 in Chicago, IllinoisUS antitrust officials filed suit on Wednesday to block the sale of General Electric's appliance business to Sweden's Electrolux, saying the $3.3 billion deal would harm consumers. The sale would limit competition and lead to higher prices of cooking appliances for US consumers, said the Justice Department, which filed the civil antitrust lawsuit in a US court in Washington. The transaction "would leave millions of Americans vulnerable to price increases for ranges, cooktops and wall ovens, products that serve an important role in family life and represent large purchases for many households," said Leslie Overton, a deputy assistant attorney general in Justice's antitrust division.



Emails show top officials aware of Clinton's private address

FILE - In this Jan. 23, 2014, then-Secretary of State Hillary Rodham testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee hearing on the deadly September attack on the U.S. diplomatic mission in Benghazi, Libya, that killed Ambassador Chris Stevens and three other Americans. Senior Obama administration officials, including the White House chief of staff, knew as early as 2009 that Hillary Rodham Clinton was using a private email address for her government correspondence, according to some 3,000 pages of correspondence released by the State Department late Tuesday night, June 20, 2015. But it's unclear whether the officials realized Clinton, now the leading Democratic presidential candidate, was running her email from a server located in her home in Chappaqua, N.Y., a potential security risk and violation of administration policy. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)WASHINGTON (AP) — Senior Obama administration officials, including the White House chief of staff, knew as early as 2009 that Hillary Rodham Clinton was using a private email address for her government correspondence, according to some 3,000 pages of correspondence released by the State Department late Tuesday night.



The Latest: Cash limits leave Greek retirees scared, angry

A pensioner shows his bank booklet outside the headquarters of National Bank of Greece in Athens, Wednesday, July 1, 2015. Pensioners are the forgotten victims of the Greek crisis. Their monthly payments have been cut in recent years, and since many lack bank cards they were totally cut off from their funds until Wednesday’s special bank sessions allowed them partial access. (AP Photo/Spyros Tsakiris)ATHENS, Greece (AP) — The latest news on Greece's financial woes (all times local):



Photos, social media now allowed on White House tours

Anthony Quintano of Hillsborough, N.J., holds up a sign against taking photos while touring the White House in Washington, Wednesday, July 1, 2015. The White House says visitors can now take photos or use social media during public tours of the building. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)WASHINGTON (AP) — Want to take a picture inside the White House Blue Room? Well, it's now OK to pull out your cellphone or camera and press "shoot."



US probing possible airline collusion to keep fares high

FILE - In this Feb. 14, 2013 file photo, Travelers pass through a corridor at Philadelphia International Airport in Philadelphia. The U.S. government is investigating possible collusion between major airlines to limit available seats, which keeps airfares high, according to a document obtained by The Associated Press. The civil antitrust investigation by the Justice Department appears to focus on whether airlines illegally signaled to each other how quickly they would add new flights, routes and extra seats.(AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. government is investigating possible collusion among major airlines to limit available seats, which keeps airfares high, according to a document obtained by The Associated Press.





Close Window